Moodscapes

Moodscape 3 | Oil on canvas

Moodscape 3 | Oil on canvas

In this series of Moodscapes, the artist, Hilary Grant-Currie, explores many varying South African landscapes, in particular, the ever-changing skies. The colours of the skies, cloud formations and endless visual depths of the sky beg to be recorded and appreciated. The artist captures fleeting moments felt from observing landscapes and focuses on the mood and emotion they bring, often sacrificing detail. Emphasis is placed on texture, colour and the feelings the landscapes evoke – in other words, the impression and emotiveness of a landscape.

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The series have become a travel log. The landscapes are places the artist has visited, and the paintings become the “postcards” travellers used to send home to loved ones and friends, sharing their own holiday memories.

Hilary Grant-Currie draws inspiration from her surroundings, particularly from nature. Always on the lookout for adventure, her family have travelled and explored our beautiful country. When not painting, the artist can be found behind the camera lens, another passion in her life, collecting material to work from. Apart from referencing photographs, some paintings have been painted “en plein air”, while others are drawn from memory and can take on a more abstract feel.

The colours vary, depending on the actual landscape, seascape, cloudscape or even the artists own mood at the time. The physical act of painting these miniature landscape treasures have become a form of therapy for the artist, almost like doodling. It is a playful interaction of paint, brush/palette knife and the artist.

At Play

Young Zulu Boy Chasing Crabs

Young Zulu Boy Chasing Crabs
At Play

"To play" means to engage in enjoyable activity for the sake of amusement. Playing is synonymous with happiness, energy, fulfilment, youth, and exuberance. To play is a verb, a doing word, hence the titles.

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This body of work captures the pleasure, the energy, the movement, the motion of physical playing. The palette is restricted to warm earthy colours, the colours of the dust in which these children play, occasionally broken by a bright white shirt or a pair of blue pants. Large free bold brush stokes, paint splatters, and unfinished elements, paint scratched into, rolled on, smeared on with a pallet knife, often end in a swift graphic sketch-like motion. In so doing energy released is encapsulated.

The games played range from kicking a ball, rolling hoops, playing on the beach or board games. Whatever the activity, it was fun. Fun is at the heart of play.